Hearing Aid Styles

Hearing aids come in a wide range of technology levels and styles. They are offered in various levels described as “Entry, Advanced, and Premium”. Within each level, different technology and features are available. Choosing the right one depends on your specific needs and requirements. Dr. Wilson will make recommendations based on your information she collected from you to help you make the right choice.

Things to Consider

    • The degree of hearing loss
    • Vision loss
    • Dexterity
    • Budget
    • Lifestyle
    • Cosmetics
    • Skin Sensitivities
    • Medical Considerations

Hearing Aid Styles

Receiver-in-the-Ear (RITE) or Receiver-in-Canal (RIC)

RITE hearing aid styles are BTEs that have the speaker built into the ear tip instead of the main body. It is still relatively unnoticeable when worn. They are designed for mild to severe hearing loss. At Dr. Wilson’s offices, this is the most commonly fit hearing aid style and uses the most current electronics technology while being very cosmetically pleasing.

Behind-the-Ear (BTE)

Behind-the-Ear instruments sit behind or on top of the outer ear with a tube that connects to an ear tip or mold inside of the ear. BTE’s offer the widest range of features, colors, battery types, and degrees of power. Today, they’re offered in small, discreet designs that are often unnoticeable when worn. For those who prefer to “show them off”, they also come in multiple colors and designs.

In-the-Ear (ITE)

Hearing aids worn in the ear are generally custom-fit based on an impression of the ear. There are a variety of ITE styles that are available.

Invisible In-the-Canal (IIC)

IIC instruments are the smallest custom hearing aids available. They sit in the second bend of the canal and are nearly invisible to the naked eye. They are designed for mild to moderate hearing loss. They do not have directional microphone technology which is the most beneficial way to reduce background noise.

Completely In-the-Canal (CIC)

CIC instruments fit deeply into the ear canal. Slightly larger than the IIC, they are still relatively hard to see. They are designed for mild to moderate hearing loss. They do not have directional microphone technology which is the most beneficial way to reduce background noise.

In-the-Canal (ITC) or Half Shell

ITC instruments sit in the lower portion of the outer ear bowl. Since they are slightly larger than the CIC, they are able to hold additional features. These include a larger battery, directional microphones, and volume controls. They are designed for mild to moderate hearing loss.

In-the-Ear (ITE) or Full Shell

Full shell instruments fill the entire outer ear bowl. Due to their larger size, they allow for more features and functions. These include a larger battery, directional microphones, volume controls, and can fit larger receivers for more severe hearing losses. They are designed for mild to severe hearing loss.

x

We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By agreeing you accept the use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.

I accept I decline Privacy Center Privacy Settings Learn More about our Cookie Policy